"Lindelof not only helped create Hurley. He was our Hurley, sharing this slice of his mind one episode at a time. It’s the place he helped make so we could find each other, but also find part of ourselves. To pillory someone who gave us that opportunity doesn’t just make you a jerk. It demonstrates that you didn’t really watch the show. You spent so much time trying to solve it that you couldn’t enjoy it. You committed all the mistakes that the show’s characters did and yet learned none of the lessons they did. There will be no one waiting for you to move on. You will be lonelier than Ben outside the church. You won’t even be outside the church. You’ll be back on your own Island, whispering with your fellow discontented denizens about how Lindelof screwed you over and wasted six years of your life on something no one forced you to watch in the first place.
The thing is, we can’t hear those whispers anymore.
Hell, we can barely even hear your screaming.
We’ve moved on.
So should you.
Forgive Damon.
Forgive yourselves.
We’ll be here waiting when you do.”
— Ryan McGee - “Fans Need to Find the Fine Line Between Fandom and Fanaticism”

"Lindelof not only helped create Hurley. He was our Hurley, sharing this slice of his mind one episode at a time. It’s the place he helped make so we could find each other, but also find part of ourselves. To pillory someone who gave us that opportunity doesn’t just make you a jerk. It demonstrates that you didn’t really watch the show. You spent so much time trying to solve it that you couldn’t enjoy it. You committed all the mistakes that the show’s characters did and yet learned none of the lessons they did. There will be no one waiting for you to move on. You will be lonelier than Ben outside the church. You won’t even be outside the church. You’ll be back on your own Island, whispering with your fellow discontented denizens about how Lindelof screwed you over and wasted six years of your life on something no one forced you to watch in the first place.

The thing is, we can’t hear those whispers anymore.

Hell, we can barely even hear your screaming.

We’ve moved on.

So should you.

Forgive Damon.

Forgive yourselves.

We’ll be here waiting when you do.”

Ryan McGee - “Fans Need to Find the Fine Line Between Fandom and Fanaticism”

26 August 2014 ·

Update on the previously announced LOST-inspired episode of Phineas and Ferb… 
Phineas and Ferb is doing a LOST-themed episode — penned by Damon Lindelof. Terry O’Quinn, who played John Locke on the 2004-10 ABC drama, will voice Professor Mystery in the Phineas and Ferb episode “Lost In Danville,” which airs September 29.
A mysterious locked capsule falls into Phineas and Ferb’s back yard, and they struggle to open it — only to discover they have unleashed something they cannot control. Meanwhile, Perry learns that Dr. Doofenshmirtz has been abducted and tracks him to Seattle where another evil scientist, Professor Mystery, has his own sinister plan. Jane Kaczmarek and Rob Morrow will voice capsule inhabitants Denise and Bernie. (Deadline)

Update on the previously announced LOST-inspired episode of Phineas and Ferb… 

Phineas and Ferb is doing a LOST-themed episode — penned by Damon Lindelof. Terry O’Quinn, who played John Locke on the 2004-10 ABC drama, will voice Professor Mystery in the Phineas and Ferb episode “Lost In Danville,” which airs September 29.

A mysterious locked capsule falls into Phineas and Ferb’s back yard, and they struggle to open it — only to discover they have unleashed something they cannot control. Meanwhile, Perry learns that Dr. Doofenshmirtz has been abducted and tracks him to Seattle where another evil scientist, Professor Mystery, has his own sinister plan. Jane Kaczmarek and Rob Morrow will voice capsule inhabitants Denise and Bernie. (Deadline)

22 August 2014 ·

15 Behind-the-Scenes Facts About LOST
Some of the former cast, crew, and creative team were kind enough to share a few tidbits and photos from their experiences working on the show with mental_floss. 

15 Behind-the-Scenes Facts About LOST

Some of the former cast, crew, and creative team were kind enough to share a few tidbits and photos from their experiences working on the show with mental_floss. 

15 August 2014 ·

Disney Channel’s Phineas and Ferb will pay tribute to LOST this fall with a special episode inspired by the ABC drama. Titled “Lost in Danville,” the animated series’ homage will find the titular duo discovering a mysterious locked capsule in their backyard. (TVLine)

Disney Channel’s Phineas and Ferb will pay tribute to LOST this fall with a special episode inspired by the ABC drama. Titled “Lost in Danville,” the animated series’ homage will find the titular duo discovering a mysterious locked capsule in their backyard. (TVLine)

28 July 2014 ·

USA Network has picked up Colony, an alien occupation drama from Carlton Cuse (LOST, Bates Motel, The Strain) and Ryan Condal (Hercules).
Set in the near future, Colony finds Los Angeles in a state of occupation by paparazzi alien intruders. While some humans collaborate with (and thus benefit from) the new “regime,” others rebel and suffer the consequences. At the crux of the story is a family torn by the opposing ideologies.
“Colony is a gripping story that brilliantly weaves together an intense family drama in an authentic, yet unknown, world,” USA Network president Chris McCumber said in a statement. “We are pleased to be in business with Ryan Condal and Carlton Cuse, who is clearly one of the best in the industry when it comes to genre fiction.” (TVLine)

USA Network has picked up Colony, an alien occupation drama from Carlton Cuse (LOST, Bates Motel, The Strain) and Ryan Condal (Hercules).

Set in the near future, Colony finds Los Angeles in a state of occupation by paparazzi alien intruders. While some humans collaborate with (and thus benefit from) the new “regime,” others rebel and suffer the consequences. At the crux of the story is a family torn by the opposing ideologies.

Colony is a gripping story that brilliantly weaves together an intense family drama in an authentic, yet unknown, world,” USA Network president Chris McCumber said in a statement. “We are pleased to be in business with Ryan Condal and Carlton Cuse, who is clearly one of the best in the industry when it comes to genre fiction.” (TVLine)

28 July 2014 ·

Elizabeth Mitchell joins Once Upon a Time in mysterious Frozen role | EW
TV geek goddess Elizabeth Mitchell is coming to Storybrooke.
EW can exclusively reveal Mitchell has joined the cast of ABC’s Once Upon a Time for a season 4 arc as part of the much-anticipated Frozen-inspired storyline. The move marks Mitchell’s return to ABC, where she became a fan favorite on LOST. Since then, she’s starred in ABC’s V and was most recently on NBC’s Revolution. Only this time, we hear Mitchell might be playing a villainous character.
Mitchell’s Once Upon role isn’t being revealed yet, but we’re told she is “possibly malevolent” with ties to royal Frozen sisters Anna (newcomer Elizabeth Lail) and Elsa (Fringe familiar Georgina Haig) as well as to Storybrooke and Arendell. The events in Once Upon are expected to take place after the events in last year’s animated Disney hit. Let the speculation begin!

Elizabeth Mitchell joins Once Upon a Time in mysterious Frozen role | EW

TV geek goddess Elizabeth Mitchell is coming to Storybrooke.

EW can exclusively reveal Mitchell has joined the cast of ABC’s Once Upon a Time for a season 4 arc as part of the much-anticipated Frozen-inspired storyline. The move marks Mitchell’s return to ABC, where she became a fan favorite on LOST. Since then, she’s starred in ABC’s V and was most recently on NBC’s Revolution. Only this time, we hear Mitchell might be playing a villainous character.

Mitchell’s Once Upon role isn’t being revealed yet, but we’re told she is “possibly malevolent” with ties to royal Frozen sisters Anna (newcomer Elizabeth Lail) and Elsa (Fringe familiar Georgina Haig) as well as to Storybrooke and Arendell. The events in Once Upon are expected to take place after the events in last year’s animated Disney hit. Let the speculation begin!

8 July 2014 ·

LOST reference on Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends.
"And now back to the season finale of Misplaced…"
Watch the clip here.

LOST reference on Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends.

"And now back to the season finale of Misplaced…"

Watch the clip here.

8 July 2014 ·

Missed The Leftovers? Don’t have HBO? HBO has put the full pilot episode up for viewing. For those who have seen it - what did you think?

Missed The Leftovers? Don’t have HBO? HBO has put the full pilot episode up for viewing. For those who have seen it - what did you think?

1 July 2014 ·

The Leftovers, Damon Lindelof’s return to television, premieres this Sunday at 10 on HBO. As I’ve said, I enjoyed the book and can’t wait to see the show. Here are snippets from two interviews with Damon as well as a great review, click the links for more.
Via Indiewire:

Damon Lindelof: The things that turn me on, turn me on. Obviously I wouldn’t have done LOST for six years if that kind of storytelling didn’t excite me. And there was something about Tom [Perotta’s] book that completely and totally captivated me. It was emotional, it was mysterious, it was surprising, but most importantly, it told a very very intimate story about people that I didn’t feel like I’d seen before.
I do feel that in the DNA of The Leftovers is the unapologetic presentation of a world that is about living an unresolved mystery, and the frustrations therein. So I almost think it would be a betrayal to Tom’s book to sort of say, ‘Oh we’re going to answer this or we’re going to answer that.’ But all of the characters are in the show are having the same experience as the audience.
Christopher Eccleston: We’re not doing a series about sci-fi, that’s not what this is about. This is about human beings and emotion and relationships and identity. So I would be very disappointed if this was tied up in a bow when it end, whenever it ends. I think the only way to be with something like this is ambiguous.

Via The Daily Beast:

Lindelof: Independent of what the reaction was to the way that LOST ended, my feelings about LOST are overwhelmingly positive. My feelings about the show itself, the experience of the show, it transcended my wildest dreams as a human being. If you had asked 12-year-old me, “What do you want to do when you grow up?” LOST was far above and beyond the storytelling that I wanted to do, as well as the way that it connected. As obnoxious as it sounds, my feeling is there’s nothing that scares me anymore because I’ve lived through every permutation—the highest of the highs, the lowest of the lows—and I walked away from it feeling like I was really happy about the work I did on this thing. And now, I’m going to do it again. LOST is a catalyst for all the work that I do now. There’s no cautionary tale there at all.
The book embraces this idea of, “I’m not going to tell you about The Departure; I’m not going to tell you how or why these people went, because that’s not what the story is about. The story is about these characters living under the condition of felling like they’ll never know. If that’s the show that you want to watch, that’s the show that we want to write. But that might not be the show that people want to watch.
Tom Perrotta: In the broadest sense, yes [the show is thematically similar to LOST]. We’re following people who are trying to make sense of something that is profoundly mysterious to them. The big difference, for me, is that this is set in a very recognizable, real world, so if you just turned it on, you’d think you were watching Friday Night Lights—which is what we’re using as the other pole of the story. The thing that excited me about LOST is that J.J. and Damon created a space where anything could happen, and The Leftovers isn’t that, so it makes for a different kind of storytelling.

Via HitFix / Alan Sepinwall’s review (grade: A):

What divine madness could have possibly compelled Damon Lindelof to involve himself with The Leftovers? Maybe he saw the opportunity to make something great. Because he sure as hell has. 
Even in a television landscape that includes The Walking Dead, Hannibal and HBO’s own Game of Thrones — dramas so committed to a violent, despairing worldview that they all but dare you to keep watching — The Leftovers is a show that will make some of its viewers want to slit their wrists. Many will hate it. But there will be viewers in whom it strikes a chord so deeply that they will feel themselves overwhelmed by it in the best possible way: not like they’re drowning in the misery, but like it’s teaching them a new way to breathe.
I realize this spell will elude many, who will turn off the show shaking their heads about the depressing tone, or at Lindelof for again giving us a group of disparate survivors of a tragedy, grappling with mysteries he’ll never be able to explain to his audience’s satisfaction. (Not that he wants or needs to in this case.)
Maybe believing that there’s an audience for this show, however selective even within the HBO universe, makes me as much of a holy fool as Reverend Matt, or as Lindelof himself. But I believe in “The Leftovers.” And I want to see more of it. Now.

The Leftovers, Damon Lindelof’s return to television, premieres this Sunday at 10 on HBO. As I’ve said, I enjoyed the book and can’t wait to see the show. Here are snippets from two interviews with Damon as well as a great review, click the links for more.

Via Indiewire:

Damon Lindelof: The things that turn me on, turn me on. Obviously I wouldn’t have done LOST for six years if that kind of storytelling didn’t excite me. And there was something about Tom [Perotta’s] book that completely and totally captivated me. It was emotional, it was mysterious, it was surprising, but most importantly, it told a very very intimate story about people that I didn’t feel like I’d seen before.

I do feel that in the DNA of The Leftovers is the unapologetic presentation of a world that is about living an unresolved mystery, and the frustrations therein. So I almost think it would be a betrayal to Tom’s book to sort of say, ‘Oh we’re going to answer this or we’re going to answer that.’ But all of the characters are in the show are having the same experience as the audience.

Christopher Eccleston: We’re not doing a series about sci-fi, that’s not what this is about. This is about human beings and emotion and relationships and identity. So I would be very disappointed if this was tied up in a bow when it end, whenever it ends. I think the only way to be with something like this is ambiguous.

Via The Daily Beast:

Lindelof: Independent of what the reaction was to the way that LOST ended, my feelings about LOST are overwhelmingly positive. My feelings about the show itself, the experience of the show, it transcended my wildest dreams as a human being. If you had asked 12-year-old me, “What do you want to do when you grow up?” LOST was far above and beyond the storytelling that I wanted to do, as well as the way that it connected. As obnoxious as it sounds, my feeling is there’s nothing that scares me anymore because I’ve lived through every permutation—the highest of the highs, the lowest of the lows—and I walked away from it feeling like I was really happy about the work I did on this thing. And now, I’m going to do it again. LOST is a catalyst for all the work that I do now. There’s no cautionary tale there at all.

The book embraces this idea of, “I’m not going to tell you about The Departure; I’m not going to tell you how or why these people went, because that’s not what the story is about. The story is about these characters living under the condition of felling like they’ll never know. If that’s the show that you want to watch, that’s the show that we want to write. But that might not be the show that people want to watch.

Tom Perrotta: In the broadest sense, yes [the show is thematically similar to LOST]. We’re following people who are trying to make sense of something that is profoundly mysterious to them. The big difference, for me, is that this is set in a very recognizable, real world, so if you just turned it on, you’d think you were watching Friday Night Lights—which is what we’re using as the other pole of the story. The thing that excited me about LOST is that J.J. and Damon created a space where anything could happen, and The Leftovers isn’t that, so it makes for a different kind of storytelling.

Via HitFix / Alan Sepinwall’s review (grade: A):

What divine madness could have possibly compelled Damon Lindelof to involve himself with The LeftoversMaybe he saw the opportunity to make something great. Because he sure as hell has. 

Even in a television landscape that includes The Walking Dead, Hannibal and HBO’s own Game of Thrones — dramas so committed to a violent, despairing worldview that they all but dare you to keep watching — The Leftovers is a show that will make some of its viewers want to slit their wrists. Many will hate it. But there will be viewers in whom it strikes a chord so deeply that they will feel themselves overwhelmed by it in the best possible way: not like they’re drowning in the misery, but like it’s teaching them a new way to breathe.

I realize this spell will elude many, who will turn off the show shaking their heads about the depressing tone, or at Lindelof for again giving us a group of disparate survivors of a tragedy, grappling with mysteries he’ll never be able to explain to his audience’s satisfaction. (Not that he wants or needs to in this case.)

Maybe believing that there’s an audience for this show, however selective even within the HBO universe, makes me as much of a holy fool as Reverend Matt, or as Lindelof himself. But I believe in “The Leftovers.” And I want to see more of it. Now.

25 June 2014 ·

LOST has once again been nominated by the Television Critics Association for the Heritage Award (which is a kind of career achievement award for shows) along with Saturday Night Live, South Park, Star Trek, and Twin Peaks.

This marks the fourth time in the past five years the show has been nominated for the award. 

The 30th Annual TCA Awards will be presented on Saturday, July 19, at the Beverly Hilton Hotel.

The last few winners of the award:
2013: Cheers (LOST was nominated)
2012: All in the Family (LOST was nominated)
2011: The Dick Van Dyke Show
2010: M*A*S*H (LOST was nominated)
2009: ER
2008: The Wire
2007: The Sopranos

LOST won 4 TCA Awards in the six years it was on television:
Outstanding New Program (2005)
Outstanding Achievement in Drama (2005)
Outstanding Achievement in Drama (2006)
Outstanding Achievement in Drama (2010, tied with Breaking Bad)

28 May 2014 ·

Fuckyeahlost

Crit is the man behind the curtain of Fuckyeahlost.

Crit with Michael Emerson:


Damon Lindelof to FYL:
"THANK YOU for keeping the cave light on."




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