Click here for more LOST Postsecrets.

Click here for more LOST Postsecrets.

22 April 2014 ·

[by Carlos]

[by Carlos]

21 April 2014 ·

21 April 2014 ·

Mixology disses the LOST finale. (From episode 1.08)

20 April 2014 ·

LOST x Frozen

LOST x Frozen

19 April 2014 ·

LOST EP Carlton Cuse looks back at plotting the finale — and picks TV’s best goodbye

We did “Across The Sea” third from the end and that was the closest thing to answers that we gave. It was the Jacob and Man In Black origin story. And that was an episode that was very polarizing and, for us, that was kind of confirmation that the answer version of a finale would never be satisfying. It would just beget more questions and that, in a way, it wasn’t really true to the spirit of the show as we intended it — that the show was a mystery. I feel like we did wrap up a lot of the biggest mysteries on the show. There was no way to sustain a mystery show for 121 episodes of television and tie up every loose end. It was just not possible. So, we really opted to find a way to take the characters to the end of their journey, and in so doing, we felt we were being fairly bold by tackling questions that were really as large as “What is the nature of existence?” and “What’s meaningful in life?” and “By what measure do we find value at the end of our journeys?” These are sort of large, ponderous questions that have no concrete answers but that was the territory we wanted to explore.
I think our mantra was to do what we’d always done, which was to write the show that we would most want to see. For Damon and for me and for the other writers, it was always about: “What is it that makes us happy? What is it that we would like to see in the finale?” And we trusted our gut and instincts, and we felt like it would be a mistake to suddenly change the methodology for the final episode. We wrote the version that we wanted to see. We stand by the finale that we wrote. It was the version of the story we wanted to tell and I think a lot of people found it enjoyable. It was inevitable that some people wouldn’t and I made my peace with that before we even wrote it. I knew that there was no version that was coming out of our computers that was going to please everybody.
We absolutely made no contingency for a sequel or a spin-off. We so definitively had decided that this was the end of our journey with the LOST franchise. We wanted to tell a story that was ending, and with our ending, and it’s called “The End” for that reason. It is the end of the story that we wanted to tell and we had no plans to go back and revisit it. I think it’s likely that at some point, ABC will want to reboot LOST because it’s a valuable franchise, and there will be some young, bright writer or writers who will come up with a great idea that the network responds to, and that’ll be great. I do not begrudge ABC the opportunity to do something more with the franchise. But we told the story we wanted to tell, and I think there’s kind of a wonderful sense of closure for us. I feel like there’s not a moment where I certainly say, “Oh, hey, I wish we had told this story” or “I regret that we didn’t get to do this or that.” I feel like we had ample opportunity to tell all the stories that we wanted to tell.

Click here to read the entire interview at EW.

LOST EP Carlton Cuse looks back at plotting the finale — and picks TV’s best goodbye

We did “Across The Sea” third from the end and that was the closest thing to answers that we gave. It was the Jacob and Man In Black origin story. And that was an episode that was very polarizing and, for us, that was kind of confirmation that the answer version of a finale would never be satisfying. It would just beget more questions and that, in a way, it wasn’t really true to the spirit of the show as we intended it — that the show was a mystery. I feel like we did wrap up a lot of the biggest mysteries on the show. There was no way to sustain a mystery show for 121 episodes of television and tie up every loose end. It was just not possible. So, we really opted to find a way to take the characters to the end of their journey, and in so doing, we felt we were being fairly bold by tackling questions that were really as large as “What is the nature of existence?” and “What’s meaningful in life?” and “By what measure do we find value at the end of our journeys?” These are sort of large, ponderous questions that have no concrete answers but that was the territory we wanted to explore.

I think our mantra was to do what we’d always done, which was to write the show that we would most want to see. For Damon and for me and for the other writers, it was always about: “What is it that makes us happy? What is it that we would like to see in the finale?” And we trusted our gut and instincts, and we felt like it would be a mistake to suddenly change the methodology for the final episode. We wrote the version that we wanted to see. We stand by the finale that we wrote. It was the version of the story we wanted to tell and I think a lot of people found it enjoyable. It was inevitable that some people wouldn’t and I made my peace with that before we even wrote it. I knew that there was no version that was coming out of our computers that was going to please everybody.

We absolutely made no contingency for a sequel or a spin-off. We so definitively had decided that this was the end of our journey with the LOST franchise. We wanted to tell a story that was ending, and with our ending, and it’s called “The End” for that reason. It is the end of the story that we wanted to tell and we had no plans to go back and revisit it. I think it’s likely that at some point, ABC will want to reboot LOST because it’s a valuable franchise, and there will be some young, bright writer or writers who will come up with a great idea that the network responds to, and that’ll be great. I do not begrudge ABC the opportunity to do something more with the franchise. But we told the story we wanted to tell, and I think there’s kind of a wonderful sense of closure for us. I feel like there’s not a moment where I certainly say, “Oh, hey, I wish we had told this story” or “I regret that we didn’t get to do this or that.” I feel like we had ample opportunity to tell all the stories that we wanted to tell.

Click here to read the entire interview at EW.

19 April 2014 ·

Via Jorge Garcia: The LOST pilot. The start of my day. The end of my day. #tbt

Via Jorge GarciaThe LOST pilot. The start of my day. The end of my day. #tbt

17 April 2014 ·

16 April 2014 ·

Sawyer’s checklist.

Sawyer’s checklist.

16 April 2014 ·

Larry King Now Interviews: Kurt Sutter and Carlton Cuse

Sons of Anarchy showrunner Kurt Sutter discusses his long career at FX with The Shield, Sons and the upcoming The Bastard Executioner. Later, LOST showrunner Carlton Cuse chats about his current hit Bates Motel and the highly anticipated The Strain.

16 April 2014 ·

Fuckyeahlost

Crit is the man behind the curtain of Fuckyeahlost.

Crit with Michael Emerson:


Damon Lindelof to FYL:
"THANK YOU for keeping the cave light on."




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