Elizabeth Mitchell joins Once Upon a Time in mysterious Frozen role | EW
TV geek goddess Elizabeth Mitchell is coming to Storybrooke.
EW can exclusively reveal Mitchell has joined the cast of ABC’s Once Upon a Time for a season 4 arc as part of the much-anticipated Frozen-inspired storyline. The move marks Mitchell’s return to ABC, where she became a fan favorite on LOST. Since then, she’s starred in ABC’s V and was most recently on NBC’s Revolution. Only this time, we hear Mitchell might be playing a villainous character.
Mitchell’s Once Upon role isn’t being revealed yet, but we’re told she is “possibly malevolent” with ties to royal Frozen sisters Anna (newcomer Elizabeth Lail) and Elsa (Fringe familiar Georgina Haig) as well as to Storybrooke and Arendell. The events in Once Upon are expected to take place after the events in last year’s animated Disney hit. Let the speculation begin!

Elizabeth Mitchell joins Once Upon a Time in mysterious Frozen role | EW

TV geek goddess Elizabeth Mitchell is coming to Storybrooke.

EW can exclusively reveal Mitchell has joined the cast of ABC’s Once Upon a Time for a season 4 arc as part of the much-anticipated Frozen-inspired storyline. The move marks Mitchell’s return to ABC, where she became a fan favorite on LOST. Since then, she’s starred in ABC’s V and was most recently on NBC’s Revolution. Only this time, we hear Mitchell might be playing a villainous character.

Mitchell’s Once Upon role isn’t being revealed yet, but we’re told she is “possibly malevolent” with ties to royal Frozen sisters Anna (newcomer Elizabeth Lail) and Elsa (Fringe familiar Georgina Haig) as well as to Storybrooke and Arendell. The events in Once Upon are expected to take place after the events in last year’s animated Disney hit. Let the speculation begin!

8 July 2014 ·

LOST reference on Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends.
"And now back to the season finale of Misplaced…"
Watch the clip here.

LOST reference on Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends.

"And now back to the season finale of Misplaced…"

Watch the clip here.

8 July 2014 ·

A great answer from Titus Welliver’s Reddit AMA.

A great answer from Titus Welliver’s Reddit AMA.

7 July 2014 ·

Here are some questions and answers from Titus Welliver’s recent Reddit AMA. Click here to read AMA’s from Carlton Cuse, Dom Monaghan, Daniel Dae Kim, and more.
Were you as disappointed with how LOST turned out as the rest of us were?I was not as invested as the series regulars in that regard. I think there are 2 camps: some people were very disappointed with the way the show wrapped up. And other fans seemed to be perfectly content. I think it’s always difficult to please everyone.
In any point of the series “LOST” did the writers tell you or even hint at “The man in Black“‘s real name?No. Sorry but that’s just the simple answer, they never did.
I really liked your evil performance on LOST and your most recent work on Transformers. On Lost, what was something told to you by the directors about your character to try and help you get into the mindset of a “smoke monster” ?I purposely asked to be kept in the dark regarding that character. Because I wanted to sort of let him just live on his own. So ignorance was bliss, in this case.
(deleted question)I get “OH SHIT” quite a bit when people see me. Particularly in New York, if I’ll walk up to a Starbucks. The funniest one was I had a homeless man come up to me, I was with my children in Grand Central Station, and he was very clearly homeless with a shopping cart full of his belongings, and he yelled out “Hey Smokey! How are things going with Jacob?!” and I was stunned by this. Here’s this guy who is ostensibly living on the street, but he’s dialed into his LOST. But he was the first person to call me Smokey.
Hey, Titus! Any fun stories from the set of Lost?One that stands out is despite the fact that I was aware of the popularity of LOST, I was not aware of the importance of my character as it works with the entire show. On one particular day, we were rehearsing a scene on-set in which I have the line “I am the black smoke.” And after I read that, Nester Carbonell looked at me and said “wow.” And I was baffled. And he responded “You understand what you just said?” And I said “Yeah.” And Nester said “I don’t think you do. Saying ‘I am the black smoke’ is like Darth Vader saying ‘No Luke, I am your father.’” That’s when it really hit me.  I am filled with gratitude to have been given the opportunity to portray a character that I feel was deeply misunderstood. My only wish would have been to have more time with Smokey.
The after-the-fact “Lost” web clip of you and Mark Pellegrino hiding in the bushes and talking about the cork metaphor … was that essentially making fun of the anti-climactic ending and the fans’ reaction to it? I have to say, I laughed pretty hard, and I was wondering how much input you and Mark Pellegrino had on that scene, or if it was entirely created by Lindleof and Cuse.I don’t know that it was to serve any negativity. I think it was more of an opportunity to put a smile on the fan’s faces. Yes, they put it together and Jack Bender shot it. And it was a tremendous amount of fun to shoot. We shot it in the bushes at Warner Brothers Studios. And Mark and I love each other, we’re old friends, so any opportunity to do something together, we jump at it. We also did a really silly thing for Jimmy Kimmel Live called "Connect 4 Million" or something, basically a spoof of Connect 4 but set on a beach, you can see it on YouTube or something but it’s really funny. Actually he and I did a lot of poking fun at our characters. 
Your mustache in Gone Baby Gone was a masterpiece and should have been nominated for Best Supporting Actor because it stole every scene it was in. Was there a particular reason that character had that style of facial hair?I still had a very very big beard from Deadwood, when I met with Ben Affleck. Because the character was written as older than I was at the time, Ben and I discussed the facial hair options. I chose to have that mustache because I felt that it really was in a way a bit of a metaphor for a man hiding behind something, keeping a secret. But it was also an homage to my good friend Sam Elliott, who has, in my opinion, the best mustache in film history.
Is Ben Affleck cool to work for?YES!!! A generous and brilliant actor, director and writer. I would do a puppet show with Ben.
What is your favourite role you’ve done on film or television?Television would be Bosch. Film would be probably Lionel McCready in Gone Baby Gone. Although James Savoy in Transformers is a delicious character.
Hello Titus! I just wondered what set was the most fun and interesting to work on? Was it Star Trek, The X-Files, LOST, or The Twilight Zone? What is your favorite role?LOST. And I would say with X-Files as a close behind. And Bosch.
What role(s) would you love to play the most that you already haven’t?I think for me I look down the road to Macbeth and Henry V and ultimately King Lear, just for a few, as it relates directly to theater. I hope that the roles continue to come.

Here are some questions and answers from Titus Welliver’s recent Reddit AMA. Click here to read AMA’s from Carlton Cuse, Dom Monaghan, Daniel Dae Kim, and more.

Were you as disappointed with how LOST turned out as the rest of us were?
I was not as invested as the series regulars in that regard. I think there are 2 camps: some people were very disappointed with the way the show wrapped up. And other fans seemed to be perfectly content. I think it’s always difficult to please everyone.

In any point of the series “LOST” did the writers tell you or even hint at “The man in Black“‘s real name?
No. Sorry but that’s just the simple answer, they never did.

I really liked your evil performance on LOST and your most recent work on Transformers. On Lost, what was something told to you by the directors about your character to try and help you get into the mindset of a “smoke monster” ?
I purposely asked to be kept in the dark regarding that character. Because I wanted to sort of let him just live on his own. So ignorance was bliss, in this case.

(deleted question)
I get “OH SHIT” quite a bit when people see me. Particularly in New York, if I’ll walk up to a Starbucks. The funniest one was I had a homeless man come up to me, I was with my children in Grand Central Station, and he was very clearly homeless with a shopping cart full of his belongings, and he yelled out “Hey Smokey! How are things going with Jacob?!” and I was stunned by this. Here’s this guy who is ostensibly living on the street, but he’s dialed into his LOST. But he was the first person to call me Smokey.

Hey, Titus! Any fun stories from the set of Lost?
One that stands out is despite the fact that I was aware of the popularity of LOST, I was not aware of the importance of my character as it works with the entire show. On one particular day, we were rehearsing a scene on-set in which I have the line “I am the black smoke.” And after I read that, Nester Carbonell looked at me and said “wow.” And I was baffled. And he responded “You understand what you just said?” And I said “Yeah.” And Nester said “I don’t think you do. Saying ‘I am the black smoke’ is like Darth Vader saying ‘No Luke, I am your father.’” That’s when it really hit me.  I am filled with gratitude to have been given the opportunity to portray a character that I feel was deeply misunderstood. My only wish would have been to have more time with Smokey.

The after-the-fact “Lost” web clip of you and Mark Pellegrino hiding in the bushes and talking about the cork metaphor … was that essentially making fun of the anti-climactic ending and the fans’ reaction to it? I have to say, I laughed pretty hard, and I was wondering how much input you and Mark Pellegrino had on that scene, or if it was entirely created by Lindleof and Cuse.
I don’t know that it was to serve any negativity. I think it was more of an opportunity to put a smile on the fan’s faces. Yes, they put it together and Jack Bender shot it. And it was a tremendous amount of fun to shoot. We shot it in the bushes at Warner Brothers Studios. And Mark and I love each other, we’re old friends, so any opportunity to do something together, we jump at it. We also did a really silly thing for Jimmy Kimmel Live called "Connect 4 Million" or something, basically a spoof of Connect 4 but set on a beach, you can see it on YouTube or something but it’s really funny. Actually he and I did a lot of poking fun at our characters. 

Your mustache in Gone Baby Gone was a masterpiece and should have been nominated for Best Supporting Actor because it stole every scene it was in. Was there a particular reason that character had that style of facial hair?
I still had a very very big beard from Deadwood, when I met with Ben Affleck. Because the character was written as older than I was at the time, Ben and I discussed the facial hair options. I chose to have that mustache because I felt that it really was in a way a bit of a metaphor for a man hiding behind something, keeping a secret. But it was also an homage to my good friend Sam Elliott, who has, in my opinion, the best mustache in film history.

Is Ben Affleck cool to work for?
YES!!! A generous and brilliant actor, director and writer. I would do a puppet show with Ben.

What is your favourite role you’ve done on film or television?
Television would be Bosch. Film would be probably Lionel McCready in Gone Baby Gone. Although James Savoy in Transformers is a delicious character.

Hello Titus! I just wondered what set was the most fun and interesting to work on? Was it Star Trek, The X-Files, LOST, or The Twilight Zone? What is your favorite role?
LOST. And I would say with X-Files as a close behind. And Bosch.

What role(s) would you love to play the most that you already haven’t?
I think for me I look down the road to Macbeth and Henry V and ultimately King Lear, just for a few, as it relates directly to theater. I hope that the roles continue to come.

6 July 2014 ·

2 July 2014 ·

Missed The Leftovers? Don’t have HBO? HBO has put the full pilot episode up for viewing. For those who have seen it - what did you think?

Missed The Leftovers? Don’t have HBO? HBO has put the full pilot episode up for viewing. For those who have seen it - what did you think?

1 July 2014 ·

27 June 2014 ·

Look who made a donation!

Look who made a donation!

26 June 2014 ·

The Leftovers, Damon Lindelof’s return to television, premieres this Sunday at 10 on HBO. As I’ve said, I enjoyed the book and can’t wait to see the show. Here are snippets from two interviews with Damon as well as a great review, click the links for more.
Via Indiewire:

Damon Lindelof: The things that turn me on, turn me on. Obviously I wouldn’t have done LOST for six years if that kind of storytelling didn’t excite me. And there was something about Tom [Perotta’s] book that completely and totally captivated me. It was emotional, it was mysterious, it was surprising, but most importantly, it told a very very intimate story about people that I didn’t feel like I’d seen before.
I do feel that in the DNA of The Leftovers is the unapologetic presentation of a world that is about living an unresolved mystery, and the frustrations therein. So I almost think it would be a betrayal to Tom’s book to sort of say, ‘Oh we’re going to answer this or we’re going to answer that.’ But all of the characters are in the show are having the same experience as the audience.
Christopher Eccleston: We’re not doing a series about sci-fi, that’s not what this is about. This is about human beings and emotion and relationships and identity. So I would be very disappointed if this was tied up in a bow when it end, whenever it ends. I think the only way to be with something like this is ambiguous.

Via The Daily Beast:

Lindelof: Independent of what the reaction was to the way that LOST ended, my feelings about LOST are overwhelmingly positive. My feelings about the show itself, the experience of the show, it transcended my wildest dreams as a human being. If you had asked 12-year-old me, “What do you want to do when you grow up?” LOST was far above and beyond the storytelling that I wanted to do, as well as the way that it connected. As obnoxious as it sounds, my feeling is there’s nothing that scares me anymore because I’ve lived through every permutation—the highest of the highs, the lowest of the lows—and I walked away from it feeling like I was really happy about the work I did on this thing. And now, I’m going to do it again. LOST is a catalyst for all the work that I do now. There’s no cautionary tale there at all.
The book embraces this idea of, “I’m not going to tell you about The Departure; I’m not going to tell you how or why these people went, because that’s not what the story is about. The story is about these characters living under the condition of felling like they’ll never know. If that’s the show that you want to watch, that’s the show that we want to write. But that might not be the show that people want to watch.
Tom Perrotta: In the broadest sense, yes [the show is thematically similar to LOST]. We’re following people who are trying to make sense of something that is profoundly mysterious to them. The big difference, for me, is that this is set in a very recognizable, real world, so if you just turned it on, you’d think you were watching Friday Night Lights—which is what we’re using as the other pole of the story. The thing that excited me about LOST is that J.J. and Damon created a space where anything could happen, and The Leftovers isn’t that, so it makes for a different kind of storytelling.

Via HitFix / Alan Sepinwall’s review (grade: A):

What divine madness could have possibly compelled Damon Lindelof to involve himself with The Leftovers? Maybe he saw the opportunity to make something great. Because he sure as hell has. 
Even in a television landscape that includes The Walking Dead, Hannibal and HBO’s own Game of Thrones — dramas so committed to a violent, despairing worldview that they all but dare you to keep watching — The Leftovers is a show that will make some of its viewers want to slit their wrists. Many will hate it. But there will be viewers in whom it strikes a chord so deeply that they will feel themselves overwhelmed by it in the best possible way: not like they’re drowning in the misery, but like it’s teaching them a new way to breathe.
I realize this spell will elude many, who will turn off the show shaking their heads about the depressing tone, or at Lindelof for again giving us a group of disparate survivors of a tragedy, grappling with mysteries he’ll never be able to explain to his audience’s satisfaction. (Not that he wants or needs to in this case.)
Maybe believing that there’s an audience for this show, however selective even within the HBO universe, makes me as much of a holy fool as Reverend Matt, or as Lindelof himself. But I believe in “The Leftovers.” And I want to see more of it. Now.

The Leftovers, Damon Lindelof’s return to television, premieres this Sunday at 10 on HBO. As I’ve said, I enjoyed the book and can’t wait to see the show. Here are snippets from two interviews with Damon as well as a great review, click the links for more.

Via Indiewire:

Damon Lindelof: The things that turn me on, turn me on. Obviously I wouldn’t have done LOST for six years if that kind of storytelling didn’t excite me. And there was something about Tom [Perotta’s] book that completely and totally captivated me. It was emotional, it was mysterious, it was surprising, but most importantly, it told a very very intimate story about people that I didn’t feel like I’d seen before.

I do feel that in the DNA of The Leftovers is the unapologetic presentation of a world that is about living an unresolved mystery, and the frustrations therein. So I almost think it would be a betrayal to Tom’s book to sort of say, ‘Oh we’re going to answer this or we’re going to answer that.’ But all of the characters are in the show are having the same experience as the audience.

Christopher Eccleston: We’re not doing a series about sci-fi, that’s not what this is about. This is about human beings and emotion and relationships and identity. So I would be very disappointed if this was tied up in a bow when it end, whenever it ends. I think the only way to be with something like this is ambiguous.

Via The Daily Beast:

Lindelof: Independent of what the reaction was to the way that LOST ended, my feelings about LOST are overwhelmingly positive. My feelings about the show itself, the experience of the show, it transcended my wildest dreams as a human being. If you had asked 12-year-old me, “What do you want to do when you grow up?” LOST was far above and beyond the storytelling that I wanted to do, as well as the way that it connected. As obnoxious as it sounds, my feeling is there’s nothing that scares me anymore because I’ve lived through every permutation—the highest of the highs, the lowest of the lows—and I walked away from it feeling like I was really happy about the work I did on this thing. And now, I’m going to do it again. LOST is a catalyst for all the work that I do now. There’s no cautionary tale there at all.

The book embraces this idea of, “I’m not going to tell you about The Departure; I’m not going to tell you how or why these people went, because that’s not what the story is about. The story is about these characters living under the condition of felling like they’ll never know. If that’s the show that you want to watch, that’s the show that we want to write. But that might not be the show that people want to watch.

Tom Perrotta: In the broadest sense, yes [the show is thematically similar to LOST]. We’re following people who are trying to make sense of something that is profoundly mysterious to them. The big difference, for me, is that this is set in a very recognizable, real world, so if you just turned it on, you’d think you were watching Friday Night Lights—which is what we’re using as the other pole of the story. The thing that excited me about LOST is that J.J. and Damon created a space where anything could happen, and The Leftovers isn’t that, so it makes for a different kind of storytelling.

Via HitFix / Alan Sepinwall’s review (grade: A):

What divine madness could have possibly compelled Damon Lindelof to involve himself with The LeftoversMaybe he saw the opportunity to make something great. Because he sure as hell has. 

Even in a television landscape that includes The Walking Dead, Hannibal and HBO’s own Game of Thrones — dramas so committed to a violent, despairing worldview that they all but dare you to keep watching — The Leftovers is a show that will make some of its viewers want to slit their wrists. Many will hate it. But there will be viewers in whom it strikes a chord so deeply that they will feel themselves overwhelmed by it in the best possible way: not like they’re drowning in the misery, but like it’s teaching them a new way to breathe.

I realize this spell will elude many, who will turn off the show shaking their heads about the depressing tone, or at Lindelof for again giving us a group of disparate survivors of a tragedy, grappling with mysteries he’ll never be able to explain to his audience’s satisfaction. (Not that he wants or needs to in this case.)

Maybe believing that there’s an audience for this show, however selective even within the HBO universe, makes me as much of a holy fool as Reverend Matt, or as Lindelof himself. But I believe in “The Leftovers.” And I want to see more of it. Now.

25 June 2014 ·

The real reason Boone died.

The real reason Boone died.

(Source: fuckyeahlost)

24 June 2014 ·

Fuckyeahlost

Crit is the man behind the curtain of Fuckyeahlost.

Crit with Michael Emerson:


Damon Lindelof to FYL:
"THANK YOU for keeping the cave light on."




Our features:

















Buy LOST on Amazon

Have a photo, tattoo or news tip to share? Send us an email!